- Language Markup and Experimental Design Software -

LMEDS is a web-based platform for running language comprehension or perception experiments with speech or text materials.

LMEDS was designed

  • to be easy to use by experiment designers with or without programming experience
  • to take advantage of crowd-sourcing websites like Amazon Mechanical Turk
  • for use in speech perception experiments, particularly Rapid Prosody Transcription annotation tasks
  • LMEDS is able to do a number of tasks

  • Administration of informed consent forms
  • Surveys / demographic surveys
  • Rapid Prosody Transcription
  • AX / AXB tasks
  • Memory tasks
  • Why Use LMEDS?

  • possibility to run experiments remotely to anyone
    (although experiments can be run locally, in a lab setting)
  • observation of subject behavior
    (number of times audio has been played, length of time spent on page)
  • fine-tuned control over audio
    (minimum and maximum number of times to play audio, duration of pause between a series of audio files)
  • unique interface for Rapid Prosody Transcription tasks
  • LMEDS can run experiments in any language and the same experiment can easily be run in multiple languages
  • it is easy to setup and run experiments
    (programming experience is not required!)
  • LMEDS functionality can be extended by users with programming experience
  • What is LMEDS like?

    Click here to try a demonstration of LMEDS' functionality.

    All of the things needed to run this demonstration are included in the LMEDS download bundle.

    To Download LMEDS

    LMEDS is written in Python, javascript, and html, is free to download and use, is open source (MIT license), and can be extended with new functionality by anyone.

    Please visit the LMEDS github page to download LMEDS.

    Look for the "download zipfile" button on the lower-right-hand side of the screen. Zipfile includes the source code, an example experiment, and an instruction manual for setting up LMEDS, preparing experiments, and processing results.

    Development of LMEDS was supported by NSF BCS 12-51343 to Jennifer Cole and José I. Hualde.

    LMEDS has been used in a number of studies

    2015

    Amelia E. Kimball, Jennifer Cole, Gary Dell, and Stefanie Shattuck-Hufnagel. Categorical vs. episodic memory for pitch accents in English. Proceedings of the International Congress of Phonetic Sciences. Glasgow, UK, August 2015.

    Tatiana Luchkina, Jennifer Cole, Preethi Jyothi, and Vandana Puri. Prosodic and structural correlates of perceived prominence in Russian and Hindi. Proceedings of the International Congress of Phonetic Sciences. Glasgow, UK, August 2015.

    Jennifer Cole, José I. Hualde, Tim Mahrt, and Chris Eager. On the prominence of accent in stress reversal Proceedings of the International Congress of Phonetic Sciences. Glasgow, UK, August 2015.

    José I. Hualde, Jennifer Cole, Tim Mahrt, Christopher Eager, and Suyeon Im. Early high and prominence perception. ETAP 3, May 2015.

    Jennifer Cole, Tim Mahrt, and Joseph Roy. New methods of crowd-sourcing for prosodic annotation: Inter-annotator agreement, individual differences, and sources of variation. ETAP 3, May 2015.

    Amelia E. Kimball, Jennifer Cole, Gary Dell, and Stefanie Shattuck-Hufnagel. Do listeners remember subcategorical acoustic detail for prosody? Berkeley Linguistics Society, Berkeley, February 2015.

    2014

    Amelia E. Kimball and Jennifer Cole. "Testing the Hypothesis of Episodic Memory for Prosody" Mid-continental Phonetics and Phonology Conference, Madison, WI, September 2014 [poster]

    Caroline Smith. Directing listeners' attention to different aspects of prosody. Presented at the 7th Conference on Laboratory Approaches to Romance Phonology, Aix-en-Provence, September 2014.

    Tim Mahrt and Jennifer Cole. The Contribution of Individual Acoustic Cues to the Perception of Focal Prominence. Laboratory Phonology 14, Tokyo, July 2014. [poster]

    Jennifer Cole, José I Hualde, Tim Mahrt, Chris Eager, and Suyeon Im. The perception of phrasal prominence in conversational speech. Laboratory Phonology 14, Tokyo, July 2014. [poster]

    Jennifer Cole, Tim Mahrt, and José I Hualde. Listening for sound, listening for meaning: Task effects on prosodic effects on prosodic transcription. Speech Prosody 7, Dublin, May 2014.

    Preethi Jyothi, Jennifer Cole, Mark Hasegawa-Johnson, and Vandana Puri. An Investigation of Prosody in Hindi Narrative Speech. Speech Prosody 7, Dublin, May 2014.